Dear Miss Sweetie

Dear Miss Sweetieomg, what a beautiful, BEAUTIFUL book Loved the history, the wise sentences, the world, the insights, the voice Stacey Lee s books keep getting better and better Oh, and I didn t even see the twists coming A must read if you like diverse, historical YA It s 1890 Atlanta Jo, who is unafraid to speak her mind, lives with Old Gin a man who took her in after she was abandoned by her parents under the house of a local publisher who is unaware that they live there When Jo overhears the folks upstairs talking about how agony aunt columns have led to newspaper sales soaring, she takes it upon herself to suggest a column and does so through a pen name Miss Sweetie They re game for it, and she begins to write these regular columns under the name and under strict anonymity Sales are up and so is interest in finding out who she really is This isn t, of course, only about others discovering who Jo is It s about Jo discovering who she is and the serious family secrets going on around her It s a book about early feminism and how white it was and how girls and women of color like Jo who is Chinese American were shut out and discriminated against in the name of equality Great writing, a really interesting slice of history I hadn t known that after the Civil War, planters brought in Chinese immigrants to fill the gap and what that meant for those people finding housing , and immersive. By Day, Seventeen Year Old Jo Kuan Works As A Lady S Maid For The Cruel Daughter Of One Of The Wealthiest Men In Atlanta But By Night, Jo Moonlights As The Pseudonymous Author Of A Newspaper Advice Column For The Genteel Southern Lady, Dear Miss Sweetie When Her Column Becomes Wildly Popular, She Uses The Power Of The Pen To Address Some Of Society S Ills, But She S Not Prepared For The Backlash That Follows When Her Column Challenges Fixed Ideas About Race And Gender While Her Opponents Clamor To Uncover The Secret Identity Of Miss Sweetie, A Mysterious Letter Sets Jo Off On A Search For Her Own Past And The Parents Who Abandoned Her As A Baby But When Her Efforts Put Her In The Crosshairs Of Atlanta S Most Notorious Criminal, Jo Must Decide Whether She, A Girl Used To Living In The Shadows, Is Ready To Step Into The Light hello lovely cover I want to touch you Stacey Lee continues to be the absolute queen of diverse historical YA and I will hear nothing otherwise Completely devoured this one and loved it just as much as the others, which is saying a lot. You can find the full review and all the fancy and or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight.This is such a lovely book I have loved every Stacey Lee book I have read, and this one is certainly no different It combines all the best things family, friendship, fighting for the rights that all people deserve, and yeah, an immensely lovable protagonist, and even a little romance Sometimes Jo s story will break your heart, and it should Indeed, her story is all too relevant in our current sociopolitical climate, which is frankly disheartening But seeing young women like Jo and loads of others in the book who you ll love too gives hope that we so desperately need Ultimately, it will provide you hope, warm your heart, and motivate you to keep on fighting the good fight An absolute win. Disclaimer I received this book from the publisher This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest The Downstairs Girl hits the right spot Stacey Lee s books always make me wonder what I would have done if I was in the protagonist s place and The Downstairs Girl is no exception Jo is a heroine you can root for because she is compassionate, always speaks her mind, and has a fierce sense of justice But at the same time, what I loved about The Downstairs Girl is that it looks at Jo s experience as a Chinese American girl living in the South where racism runs in the streets Often we talk about the treatment of black people during this time period and Lee s book examines the place that Asian Americans, specifically Chinese Americans, occupied as neither privileged enough for their skin color to be inconsequential, and not fitting into the rules imposed on society to segregate black people.full review Stacey Lee writes some of my hands down favorite YA historical fiction and The Downstairs Girl does not disappoint There were some things that felt a little too convenient or coincidental and I have some questions about the results of the horse race which I won t share here because spoilers , but Jo was an amazing heroine with whom I really enjoyed spending my time And, unfortunately for us all, the parallels between society and politics and race relations in 1890 and now are depressingly obvious The research and love of history are clear but, as always it s Lee s characters who shine brightly from the pages Not just Jo but Old Gin especially Old Gin and Noemi and Sweet Potato yes, the horse and the Paynes and the Bells and even the despicable Billy Riggs As long as Stacey Lee wants to continue writing historical fiction, I will want to continue reading it. flails I NEED THIS IMMEDIATELY. this is the type of badass journalist girl historical fiction I m here for

Stacey Lee is a fourth generation Chinese American whose people came to California during the heydays of the cowboys She believes she still has a bit of cowboy dust in her soul A native of southern California, she graduated from UCLA then got her law degree at UC Davis King Hall After practicing law in the Silicon Valley for several years, she finally took up the pen because she wanted the perk

[Reading] ➻ Dear Miss Sweetie By Stacey  Lee – Stockbag.info
  • Hardcover
  • 304 pages
  • Dear Miss Sweetie
  • Stacey Lee
  • English
  • 27 November 2018

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